Dream Shifting

Dream actors and architects are capable of transitioning between dreams. The most natural means of transitioning between dreams occurs when two or more dreams overlap in appearance. In this instance a dream avatar need only be aware of the dream and then move from the shared overlap to the new dream location. So long as the dreams continue to overlap, the passenger can continue to move between the dreams. Once the overlap is no longer identical, the dreams are no longer connected.

Perceiving Near Adjacent Dreams

When dreams are close to overlapping, a dream actor can attempt to perceive the nearby dream by making a DC 15 Intelligence check. If successful, the actor perceives the nearly adjacent dream as a shadowy overlay. A dream architect makes this check with advantage.

On its own, perceiving other dreams does little. However, a skilled dream architect can use this knowledge to attempt to reshape the current dream to more precisely match the adjacent dream and create an overlap to allow dream actors to transition between dreams. It can also be possible for actors to attempt to manipulate a dreamer into dreaming the current dream to better match the adjacent location. Such efforts depend on the dreamer and resolving any theme issues that could interfere.

Alternately, a dream architect could manipulate the dream to become more divergent, severing any hope of connection between dreams. Likewise, manipulating the dreamer to alter the dream’s landscape and theme can also sever any potential overlap.

The Gray Void

One way of attempting to move between dreams involves breaching the boundaries of a dream and entering the very fabric of the Dreamscape. The area between dreams is called the Gray Void because it is exactly that – a featureless gray space that is seemingly endless.

When two or more dreams are close to overlapping, each dream can be perceived within the Gray Void as a shimmering, distorted image. When dreams aren’t close to overlapping, the Gray Void is a vast empty expanse.

The Gray Void is avoided by dream denizens and architects because it is a dangerous place due to its nature. Sometimes it is referred to as the Nothingness for it is nothing. Within the Gray Void there are no structures or surfaces or landmarks of any sort. It has no up or down and no sense of gravity.

Two major dangers exist within the Gray Void. The first and foremost is that a creature within it can become lost, possibly forever. When a creature roams the Nothingness without a nearby dream, it has no guidepost. Within the void a creature also has no sense of direction. It is plausible to wander in a circle and never realize it. An object dropped within the void will persist for up to 1 minute before the object melts into the fabric of the plane. The other major threat is falling into a hole to the plane of Limbo. Such holes are undetectable. A creature may attempt a DC 25 Wisdom saving throw to realize it is falling into Limbo and pull back, but escape at this point is not guaranteed as the creature has no idea how large the hole is or where exactly it covers. Another misstep results in the creature making a new saving throw.

For a dreamer or a visitor to the Dreamscape, escape from the Gray Void only requires waking up. Doing so will result in the creature gaining one level of exhaustion. For a denizen of the Dreamscape, however, the only escape is to enter a dream. Since a denizen can’t awaken to escape, it will be forced to wander the void until it stumbles upon the boundary of a dream. A hole to Limbo is fatal to a dream denizen since under normal circumstance, a dream denizen can’t exist outside the Dreamscape.

Once each hour when a creature wanders the expanse of the Gray Void roll 2d20. On a 40, roll 2d10 and consult the Gray Void Encounters table.

Gray Void Encounters

2D10 Result
Encounter
2The creature encounters a hole to Limbo, a space comprised of 1d100 x 1d10 5-foot cubes that must be contiguous but can have any arrangement. Each minute, 10% of the cubes shift to an adjacent space, or a section of the hole changes position. Whenever a creature attempts to enter a space containing the hole, it must make a DC 25 Wisdom saving throw. If it succeeds, it returns to its previous space and has its movement speed set to 0 until the start of its next turn. If the save fails, the creature is dumped to a random spot in Limbo.
3-5Over the horizon, a shimmering boundary of a dream can be seen. It is 300 + 3d10 x10 feet away. When any creature approaches within 200 feet of the boundary the dream and its boundary vanishes.
6-13The creature enters the same place in the Gray Void it previously occupied within the last hour.
14-17Over the horizon, a shimmering boundary of a dream can be seen. It is 300 + 3d10 x10 feet away. A creature can cross the boundary by using its action and passing a DC 10 Charisma check. If successful, the creature breaches the boundary and enters the dream. The dream boundary will persist for 5d6 minutes.
18-19A shimmering dream boundary appears within 30 feet. A creature can cross the boundary by using its action and passing a DC 10 Charisma check. If successful, the creature breaches the boundary and enters the dream. The dream boundary will persist for 2d6 minutes.
201 (70%) or 1d6 (30%) creatures wandering the Gray Void are spotted 300 feet away. The creature is a dream actor (95%) or a storyteller (5%). Only one storyteller is present, and if it is part of a group, the storyteller is escorting the other creatures. A storyteller can be persuaded to guide a lost group to a dream. In the presence of a storyteller, make a new encounter roll every 10 minutes and roll 5d4 instead of 2d10.